Dreamtellers

For composition class this last fall one of our assignments was an image about "dreamtellers", which it was our task to define and then depict. I decided that a dreamteller must be like a bank teller at an institution that issues dreams, so I set about working out what that would look like.

I started out making thumbnails, of which I must have made over 60. I started to coalesce around the idea of a teller window inside a huge statue of an owl decorated with clocks and star charts and other items related to telling time. Here is a progression of thumbs from early stuff to what became the basis for the final illustration:

And some thumbs from near the end:

 

I wanted to give acrylics a try so I took some reference shots and started in on an underpainting:

Unfortunately the painting started to get overworked and the others suggested I try something different. I ended up working digitally using my thumbnail as an underpainting and layering in a bunch of textures and the photoshop brushes I'd been working on in painting class. Here's how things turned out:

The figures are not my favorite, but I had a ton of fun working out all the carvings and architecture.

Looking at this now with some distance from it there are a lot of little things where I don't know what I was thinking. Because we built up the compositions for this project over such a long time the work on this piece dragged out over several months, far longer than I've ever worked on a single piece before. I wonder now if this is a good lesson in objective distance. After you've been looking at something for ages it's hard to get a clear picture of what's really there. Stephen King in his On Writing book mentions that after he finishes the first draft of a story he put's it in a drawer for a while and doesn't look at it for a few weeks (or maybe it was even months). Only then does he take it back out and start editing. I can see where that is a useful practice.